The one-hour project: summer

High summer is a fabulous time for garden photographers. The colours are vibrant, the air is warm and inviting, and the pollinators are feasting.

Nature is in her pomp, dazzling us with her velvet beauty.

© Lisa Cordaro Photography
© Lisa Cordaro Photography

This season I wanted to concentrate on insects and pollinators. We’re all aware of the plight that bees in particular are experiencing at the moment, and it’s heartening to see professional and public gardeners supporting their nurture and care.

Lawns and grass borders are being left with clover and dandelions to grow, feeding our apian friends. And little wildflower meadows are being planted in public spaces for them to eat, drink and be merry.

As for flowers, who wouldn’t be tempted by these bright echinacea and anemones?

© Lisa Cordaro Photography
© Lisa Cordaro Photography

Bees are notoriously difficult to capture. They flit from flower to flower, intent on collecting as much delicious pollen and nectar as they can, while they can.

© Lisa Cordaro Photography
© Lisa Cordaro Photography

Butterflies feed on nectar, but they also do their bit, helping to pollinate plants.

© Lisa Cordaro Photography
© Lisa Cordaro Photography

The contrast between the silver foliage and yellow flowers of this curry plant caught my eye. But it was only when I got in close that I realised it was covered in bugs!

© Lisa Cordaro Photography
© Lisa Cordaro Photography

We don’t have to be professionals to help our pollinators: something as small as a window box, even a tiny garden with pots or a border, can do wonders.

Choose plants that run from early spring to late autumn, with open blooms that give easy access to insects. Grow organic if you can; but if you can’t, avoid bug sprays, chemical-laden slug pellets and weedkiller, and use natural alternatives. Want to assassinate the greenfly attacking your roses? Ladybirds are ninja when it comes to munching aphids!

Growing plants as naturally as possible not only gives us the pleasure of colour and interest through the seasons, but our beautiful, fuzzy friends the vital nourishment they need to survive.

Let’s help them to help us, and enjoy the bounty they bring for years to come.

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